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acyart asked: Teach me how to art?

dirtyduckdraw:

Sure thing.

Step 01 : Shut up and draw.

   - Don’t whine about other artists being better, more popular, etc etc. Don’t whine about not being good enough. Don’t worry about popularity or money or any of that shit. They’re awesome, but wont help you draw any better. (If you enjoy what you’re drawing and do it well odds are good they’ll happen on their own.) Don’t fall victim to distractions and “easy outs” or “I don’t feel it” moods. Take a break, walk around, stretch, get a drink, clear your head, then shut up and draw.

Step 02 : Never stop. Ever.

   - Do it every day. Practice constantly. Make it your obsession. Draw what you see, what you know, what you like. Try new techniques. Look at how artists you like do things, emulate it, then twist it into your own version. Make sure your style is yours and not a carbon copy of someone else. Carry a sketchbook with you to work, school, everywhere. Draw when you wake up. Draw when you’re tired. Draw when you’re bored. Want to play a video games? Draw instead. Draw when you should be doing something else. Draw. Draw. Draw. Never stop. Ever.

Do that for a few years and you’re golden. There is no trick or magic spell that can make you draw exactly like you want right now. Artists are like Saiyans, every fight makes them stronger. Every picture makes us better.

Go draw.

Photoset

raspbeary:

requested!! its just some stuff ive learned idk dont trust me too much, i had the parts for this laying around for days and was too lazy to put text on it i also added a collage of some chests ive done last minute

(via chaoticpeace10)

Photoset
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4-H continued

Wohoo. I have done lessons about digital painting online a few times and enjoyed it. However this was the first time I have ever done a class in a classroom. Rather exhausting but the thrill in the kids eyes makes it worth it.
Have to say that was the highlight of my day.

Photo
mylittledoxy:

Laying down the groundwork for future tutorials on the subject.Support me on patreon for weekly psds and videos! http://www.patreon.com/doxydoo

Full size here http://mldoxy.deviantart.com/art/Shiny-Things-446808360

mylittledoxy:

Laying down the groundwork for future tutorials on the subject.

Support me on patreon for weekly psds and videos! http://www.patreon.com/doxydoo

Full size here http://mldoxy.deviantart.com/art/Shiny-Things-446808360

(via darkdoxy)

Chat

4-H

  • I get to teach a bunch of kids between the ages of 7 and 14 how to paint in the digital realm! A brief introduction to computer generated artwork! I am overly excited to see how creative the little ones will be.
  • And.... hopefully the project I have planned for them wont be to hard...
  • Or to easy X.x
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finally done with the lines on this one… it got lost in the shuffle of homework and other projects

finally done with the lines on this one… it got lost in the shuffle of homework and other projects

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grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

(via chaoticpeace10)

Photo
slugbox:

EVERYONE FUCKING… DPI… JUST… OKAY… I got this question, and I’m not going to answer it as an ask because you should spread this around. There is a bigger, more important issue at hand here, which fundamentally confounds a lot of people. WHAT IS DPI?
DPI is a sort of a “myth.” It’s arbitrary. It’s not a unit of measurement. It’s a ratio that YOU decide. Which means it is essentially nothing, and ultimately sort of pointless in MOST digital art uses. People don’t really understand that 1500x1500 at 72DPI is the SAME SIZE as 1500x1500 at 600DPI. And 1500 x 1500 is a relatively small canvas size. It’s tiny. And regardless of its DPI, it’s going to look the same on your monitor.
Don’t believe me? Try it. Open an image in your art program. Any program. Change the DPI to anything you want, but keep the dimensions the SAME (some programs auto change the dimensions). Does it look any different? No. Because it isn’t. It’s the same pixels on the same monitor. 
DPI is used to assign measurements for a final source. For example, generally computer monitors are 72DPI. So that means you fit 72 dots in an inch. Print on paper is 300 dots per inch. Mobile devices pack an insane amount of dots in, but then double pixel for a lot of graphics. Printing on fabric is generally 100. It’s only useful to know the DPI so you can talk and understand things relatively. 300 is the standard for “art,” since “art” is usually printed. That’s just our standard. If you DIDN’T assign a DPI as a source, no device or person would know how many pixels translate into how many whatever-units-the-file-being-exported-to-uses.
But for digital talk, it doesn’t even fucking matter. Saying 72DPI is pointless since everyone is measuring in pixels ANYWAY. Very few people are printing things. Give someone the exact PIXEL dimensions. 640x480. 1920x1200. etc. We’re all using the same standard, more or less.
Here’s an EASY to understand example: A soccer field is 7140 Square Meters. It’s also 8539 square yards. But it’s the same fucking size, no matter how you want to define its units. If you take the field from Europe to America, or vice versa, the DPI changes, but the SIZE IS THE SAME. (I hope I got my math right. Regardless, the principal stands.)
1500x1500 at 72DPI is the SAME SIZE as 1500x1500 at 600DPI. You’re just measuring out the area differently. You could invent a unit called a fuckwad that is exactly 1/5th the size of the longer edge of a soccer field if you wanted to. You could measure things in fuckwads. The soccer field would be five fuckwads on the longer axis, But things would STILL be the same size.
Regardless, 1500x1500 isn’t suitable for a lot of things. That’s like playing soccer on a fourth of a field. It’s not enough room for everyone to make large-scale plays or detailed movements. In digital terms, it’s generally not enough room for you to draw on.
So the next time you are confused why your 500px canvas isn’t getting “more detailed” when you jack up the DPI to 10000, you know why.

slugbox:

EVERYONE FUCKING… DPI… JUST… OKAY… I got this question, and I’m not going to answer it as an ask because you should spread this around. There is a bigger, more important issue at hand here, which fundamentally confounds a lot of people. WHAT IS DPI?

DPI is a sort of a “myth.” It’s arbitrary. It’s not a unit of measurement. It’s a ratio that YOU decide. Which means it is essentially nothing, and ultimately sort of pointless in MOST digital art uses. People don’t really understand that 1500x1500 at 72DPI is the SAME SIZE as 1500x1500 at 600DPI. And 1500 x 1500 is a relatively small canvas size. It’s tiny. And regardless of its DPI, it’s going to look the same on your monitor.

Don’t believe me? Try it. Open an image in your art program. Any program. Change the DPI to anything you want, but keep the dimensions the SAME (some programs auto change the dimensions). Does it look any different? No. Because it isn’t. It’s the same pixels on the same monitor. 

DPI is used to assign measurements for a final source. For example, generally computer monitors are 72DPI. So that means you fit 72 dots in an inch. Print on paper is 300 dots per inch. Mobile devices pack an insane amount of dots in, but then double pixel for a lot of graphics. Printing on fabric is generally 100. It’s only useful to know the DPI so you can talk and understand things relatively. 300 is the standard for “art,” since “art” is usually printed. That’s just our standard. If you DIDN’T assign a DPI as a source, no device or person would know how many pixels translate into how many whatever-units-the-file-being-exported-to-uses.

But for digital talk, it doesn’t even fucking matter. Saying 72DPI is pointless since everyone is measuring in pixels ANYWAY. Very few people are printing things. Give someone the exact PIXEL dimensions. 640x480. 1920x1200. etc. We’re all using the same standard, more or less.

Here’s an EASY to understand example: A soccer field is 7140 Square Meters. It’s also 8539 square yards. But it’s the same fucking size, no matter how you want to define its units. If you take the field from Europe to America, or vice versa, the DPI changes, but the SIZE IS THE SAME. (I hope I got my math right. Regardless, the principal stands.)

1500x1500 at 72DPI is the SAME SIZE as 1500x1500 at 600DPI. You’re just measuring out the area differently. You could invent a unit called a fuckwad that is exactly 1/5th the size of the longer edge of a soccer field if you wanted to. You could measure things in fuckwads. The soccer field would be five fuckwads on the longer axis, But things would STILL be the same size.

Regardless, 1500x1500 isn’t suitable for a lot of things. That’s like playing soccer on a fourth of a field. It’s not enough room for everyone to make large-scale plays or detailed movements. In digital terms, it’s generally not enough room for you to draw on.

So the next time you are confused why your 500px canvas isn’t getting “more detailed” when you jack up the DPI to 10000, you know why.

(via stickysheep)

Photoset

madoka07:

2014 “Magical Girl” Acrylic paint, Canvas F10 17.91x20.86

exhibition work
"Magical Girl Heroines: Sailor Moon and sailor senshi"
http://www.facebook.com/events/658896564156271

Making video :) / Canvas art “Magical Girl”
http://youtu.be/jNjji8I5VbY

(via mommafluff)